1750

1750-1830 the Lekwiltokw started a southward move into K’omoks territory, pushing the Ieeksun to join their relatives at Puntledge.

1792

Captain George Vancouver encountered K’omoks people at Tsakwaluten.

1862

The smallpox outbreak in 1862 saw about a 53% decline in K'omoks people.

1875

1875 E&N Railway Act expropriates a large portion of KFN traditional territory and the land grant was completed without acknowledgement of KFN rights or title to traditional territory and failed to compensate them. 

1876

1876- JIRC confirms Comox IR#1

1876

The Indian Act is forced upon all First Nations by the Canadian Government, to deal with the "Indian problem".

1878

1878 JIRC adds two more reserves IR#2 and IR#3

1883

1883 Comox Coal Fields developed which would alter KFN traditional territory forever.

1886

In 1886 Franz Boas arrives in Comox. Boas was a famed anthropologist and ethnologist who studied the People of the North West Coast, and particulary the Kwakiutl. 

1940

Joe Nim Nim, the last Pentlatch speaker passes away.

1941

In 1941 the Salmon River becomes K’ómoks IR#4. 

1957

1957 Chief Andy Frank organized a traditional ceremony to raise two totem poles at Lewis Park. The poles were arranged for by the Royal BC Museum, and carved by Mungo Martin, David Martin, and Henry Hunt. The Courtenay Board of Trade had previously acquired 2 poles believed to be carved by Chief Joe Wallace, but the poles became badly decayed before he could raise them. Rather than replicate the Wallace poles, Mungo created his own version of the same figures. Ancient songs and dances were performed, and many high-ranking First Nations people attended in ceremonial regalia.

1958

The K’omoks Bighouse is constructed, only the 2nd on the Coast to be built since early times. It was originally located at Centennial Park, until 1974.

1960

Until 1960, the only way a First Nations person could vote was to give up their status. In 1960 the federal government extended the vote to include all status Indians, thereby dropping the need to give up their status. 

1750
1792
1862
1875
1876
1876
1878
1883
1886
1940
1941
1957
1958
1960

Pages

Land Use Plan

The K'ómoks First Nation Constitution and Land Use Plan

Business

The K'ómoks First Nation is a key economic stakeholder in the Comox Valley.

Marine Use Plan

The K'ómoks First Nation Marine Use Plan

 

K'ómoks First Nation is a prosperous and healthy community where each member has the opportunity to be self sufficient.

K'ómoks members move forward with our neighbors, exercising our rights and title while respecting our historical connections to our lands and resources, and to one another.